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lizclimo:

and now, a comic about the other kind of football. happy birthday america

(via thefrogman)

angel-lilly:

theblueknightgarcia:

Sailor Moon Crystal FAQ & Guide!

Credits:made by Sailor Moon 2014: News and Information

justrandomlyawesome I know you’ll want to know about this me lovely Andy~ra~ra~

Awwww thank youuuuuuu me rawr~beccaaaaa :D it was so helpful!

Sailor Moon Crystal!!!!!!!! Release date: july 5- 6am! #SailorMoon #Crystal #Toei #NaokoTakeuchi #2014

jtotheizzoe:

via makinaro:

The Hot-Hands bias comes from basketball, where a player who has scored several successive shots in a row is believed to have “hot hands” or is on a streak. Members of their team will pass to them more, and members of the opposing team will increase attacks on that player. When you look at the wider picture, it becomes apparent that their hands were not hot at all, just their perception of success.

Monkey See, Monkey Make Logical Fallacy

Like a fresh banana of psychological weirdness, here’s another cognitive fallacy for you to chew on! Follow Maki’s comic with Carl Zimmer’s wonderful New York Times article on how we aren’t the only monkeys to fall victim to the peculiarities of pattern recognition.

Zimmer, discussing recent research by psychologist Andreas Wilke, notes that our tendency to see streaks of good fortune, whether it’s 3-pointers or poker hands, might hold its origin in foraging for food:

Our ancestors were constantly searching for food, either gathering plants or hunting animals. As they searched, they had to continually decide where to look next. The wrong choice could mean starvation.

Dr. Wilke argues that this threat led our ancestors to evolve some rules of thumb based on the fact that animals and plants aren’t scattered randomly across a landscape. Instead, they can be found in clumps.

That meant that if our ancestors picked up a fruit from the ground, they were likely to find more by looking nearby, rather than going somewhere else. As a result, they became very sensitive to these streaks. They were an indication that good fortune would keep coming.

Whether you’re looking for food or a flush, the first step towards a life where you are not being tricked by your brain on a regular basis is to learn exactly how your brain is tricking you on a regular basis.

Related: Have you seen this week’s episode of It’s Okay To Be Smart? It’s all about cognitive biases, logical fallacies, and blowing on Nintendo games. Watch below:

jtotheizzoe:

thebrainscoop:

Happy Birthday, Walter Potter!

Walter Potter (2 July 1835 – 21 May 1918) was a Victorian taxidermist most famous for his eccentric anthropomorphic taxidermy. He received fame and accolades for such lovely scenes as “The Kittens’ Wedding” (his final creation in 1890), and his Rabbit School. Potter first began exploring the recreation of nursery rhymes using preserved and costumed animals in 1854 at the age of 19, and completed his most famous work, “The Death and Burial of Cock Robin,” which included 96 species of British birds. 

With encouragement and support from his local community, Potter was able to earn a living and support his family at an Inn in Bramber, a small town in West Sussex. Locals commissioned Walter to preserve their pets and he relied on donations of dead animals to populate his fanciful scenes. The clothes were created by his neighbors and his daughter Minnie. 

Many of Potter’s works remained on display at the Bramber Inn, which was turned into a Museum during his life in order to house more than 10,000 specimens. The original Museum eventually closed in the 1970s and moved to Cornwall in 1984, before being sold and disbanded in 2003. 

Sources: 
Telegraph UK
Walter Potter’s Curious World of Taxidermy by Dr. Pat Morris
Walter Potter Taxidermy

You say “eccentric anthropomorphic taxidermy” when you really mean “literally the best thing ever.”

I want a photo of this over my kitchen table

afghangster:

people romanticize growing up in the 90s but we had our struggles 

(Source: 0ver-doze, via key-crown-ring7)

(Source: herphany, via xeridicis)

kelsium:

You can tell a girl she’s smart her whole life, encourage her in school, buy her a chemistry set, send her to math camp, help her apply for college scholarships in STEM fields, and she’s still eventually going to walk into a classroom, a lab, or a job interview and have some man dismiss her existence, deny her funding, pass her over for a promotion, or take credit for her work. How about you work on getting those assholes out of power and quit telling me not to call girls pretty.

(via thesweetpianowritingdownmylife)

Just at a doctors office, scrolling down my dash and then all of a sudden porn gif.

Awks